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Should I get the COVID-19 vaccine if I’m pregnant? What if I have a weakened immune system or already had COVID?

Last Updated: 02/12/2021

Pregnant or Breastfeeding Individuals

Individuals who are pregnant are eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine in New Jersey, but should first discuss vaccination with their medical provider before receiving the vaccine.

Pregnant people are at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 compared to non-pregnant people. At the same time, there is limited data about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines for people who are pregnant.

Getting vaccinated is a personal choice for people who are pregnant and a discussion with a healthcare provider could help you make an informed decision.

For more information, refer to the CDC'svaccination considerations for people who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Individuals With Underlying Medical Conditions

Individuals with weakened immune systems are eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine in New Jersey, but should first discuss vaccination with their medical provider before receiving the vaccine.

According to the CDC, individuals with weakened immune systems might be at increased risk for severe COVID-19. At the same time, there is limited information about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines for people who have weakened immune systems.

Getting vaccinated is a personal choice and a discussion with a healthcare provider could help you make an informed decision.

For more information, refer to the CDC'svaccination considerations for persons with underlying medical conditions.

Individuals Recovered From COVID-19

People who have gotten sick with COVID-19 should still get vaccinated.

At this time, experts do not know how long someone is protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. The immunity someone gains from having an infection varies from person to person. Some early evidence suggests natural immunity may not last very long.

Although there is no minimal interval between infection and vaccination, current evidence suggests reinfection is uncommon in the 90 days after initial infection, and thus persons with documented acute infection in the preceding 90 days may defer vaccination until the end of this period, if desired.

Source:https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/recommendations/pregnancy.html;https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/recommendations/underlying-conditions.html;Commissioner Persichilli's Remarks 1/13/21